COVID-19 And Private Practice: How To Build a Telemedicine Practice | Mountain Man Digital

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COVID-19 And Private Practice: How To Build a Telemedicine Practice
Happy Telemedicine Practice- Happy Dog?!

COVID-19 And Private Practice: How To Build a Telemedicine Practice

The past week or so has seen many of my clients showing a reduction of 50% or more in revenue already. With many people afraid to leave their homes for fear of spreading COVID-19, patient bookings and even current appointments are plummeting. What’s more, new patients have all but dried up. Several states have already put full lockdowns into place. This means no patients at all.

What to do?

Telemedicine as a new solution

Medical Practices such as chiropractic or dental are, of course, a hands on practice. Seeing and literally touching patients is key to your work. However, there are real solutions you can offer to your patients (and even new patients worldwide) at this time, without physically seeing them in your office. This is something you can set up in a weekend, won’t take any type of special “training” or a course, and will allow you to start offering telemedicine through your office in a matter of days.

So come on, what do you have to lose?

Setting Up Telemedicine Easily

Setting up for telemedicine is actually very simple. If you’ve ever used zoom.us, you’ll immediately understand how to set up doxy.me, which is a free telemedicine software. 

Once you’ve made an account, head over to the dashboard, and you’ll get a unique link that you can send to patients via email, text or direct message.

Then they log in, join your waiting room, and you start a call with them when you’re ready.

That’s it. You’re ready to see patients remotely.

This opens up a number of great options to you as a chiropractor: 

  1. Early/from home postural screenings – This alone, when implemented after the quarantine passes, could double your business. A simple impulse buy to have a real doctor assess your posture from the comfort of your own home is a great pitch in and of itself, without a quarantine in place. 
  2. Helping patients with at home exercises, and ongoing physical therapy – Many people are trying to stay active and trying random YouTube videos to fill the void. You can take this opportunity to build relationships and help folks stay mobile.
  3. Ergonimics help with at home work setups – For many people, this is the first time they’ve ever worked from home. Couch desks, laptops in bed, and terribly contorted spines will prevail as we all adjust to our new lifestyle.
  4. Anything else you think would benefit your patients and their health – You know your patients best. What do you think they could gain or improve on even from a distance?

Marketing Telemedicine

Now that you have some ideas for services and you’ve set up a way to accept patients virtually, let’s look into actually telling your current patients (and potential new ones) about these new services, and give them an option to sign up.

MailChimp: Current Patient Marketing in under 10 minutes.

If you’re like most doctors, you have an email list of your current and past patients that you rarely, if ever, use.  If you do send a regular newsletter to your patients, great! Draft up a new one and explain the new services you’re offering. The email should go something like this:

Good Morning (Patient’s First Name), 

To help better serve you, we have set up a new way to help give you great patient care from your own home. 

As a patient of (your practice name), you are eligible to receive the following services, straight from our patient portal found at this link (link this text to your doxy.me account with the unique link).
From here, list the services you can offer specifically, and let them know where to reach you or your staff with any questions.

Send out emails/contact cancelled appointments from the past few weeks and rebook with remote sessions.

Take the time to contact those patients you’ve lost in the past few weeks and call them if you can. Inform them that you’ve set up a telemedicine system, you think they can benefit, and you’d like to schedule an initial appointment using this method. Be prepared to answer questions about insurance billing and technology. Fortunately, doxy.me is built to specifically be friendly to the technologically un-inclined, and should prove easy to set up for most patients. 

Take the time to help them set up a patient account right on the phone and make sure they understand how to join the waiting room before you get off. Be sure to let your patients know the amount of space they’ll need during the session and what types of clothing to wear. You may also insist that the patient must be alone during the session. 

Add Telemedicine To Your Google My Business/Bing Places/Apple Maps

You will want to add these remote services you’re now offering to each of these places online. This alone will get you to start showing up in searches for those specifically looking for a doctor that wishes to work with them remotely.  Since this is a new market, your chance of ranking well almost instantly is very high. For a full guide on how to optimize your Google My Business Account, Click HERE!

Do a telemedicine session with a favorite patient, record it, and share the highlights on social media.

 With appropriate HIPAA disclosures signed, use a program like OBS (www.obsproject.com) to record your screen as you work with your patient. Take snapshots of 1-3 minutes showcasing the work you’re doing with your patients.

When you post these online, be sure to include links where new potential patients can sign up to either be called by you, or to schedule an appointment directly. Always give interested leads the option to buy!

Add Telemedicine to the Services page of your website.

Take the information you used in your email, and Facebook posts to draft a simple section of your services page on your site that explains your telemedicine services. Make a live link below this section that leads to the signup for doxy.me. This will give current and potential patients an easy way to sign up without having to contact your office first.

Keep a journal of how your new Telemedicine business is doing.

Keeping a daily log of how a new business venture is going is a great way to make sure you’re moving in the right direction. Keep tabs on the number of patients you’re seeing, how long the sessions are going, and if there are any recurring issues that might be fixed with a simple email to all patients, or a small change in procedure. Don’t let initial issues dishearten you! Any new business has its problems, and it will get better– for you AND your patients! 

If you have any thoughts, questions, etc. just comment below and I’d be happy to help!